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Jacques Pierre Paul Raverat (20th March 1885 - 6th March 1925) was a French painter born in Paris, France in 1885. He was the son of  Georges Pierre Raverat and Helena Lorena Raverat. Georges was that rarity in Frenchmen, a vegetarian, and a great believer in British education, especially that of the experimental liberal variety found at Bedales where Jacques was sent. Raverat went up to Jesus College Cambridge in 1910 where his taste for Shakespeare developed. A mystery illness persuaded him to abandon the maths he had embarked on at Jesus and take up painting. He met Gwen Darwin at rehearsals of the Marlowe Society's second production, Comus and joined her at the Slade School of Art in London. After his proposals of marriage were twice rejected by Ka Cox, he turned to Gwen and married her in 1911. The couple were active members of Rupert Brooke's Neo-Pagan group of intellectuals and to a lesser degree of Virginia Woolf's Bloomsbury Group.

They had two daughters, Elisabeth (1916–2014), who married the Norwegian politician Edvard Hambro in 1940 and Sophie Jane (1919-2011) who married the Cambridge scholar Mark Pryor also in 1940.

When attempting to sign up into the French army in 1915, his mystery illness was diagnosed as Multiple Sclerosis and he was classified as unfit for service. In 1920 they moved to Vence near Nice in the south of France since it was felt the climate would do him good. Despite the many struggles imposed by his illness and looking after two young girls, their artistic output was at its most eloquent and effective - her wood-engravings and his Cezanne-inspired landscapes.

Their correspondence with Virginia Woolf in his last five years was remarkable - Virginia was able to tell them things she told no one else, while Jacques - using Gwen as his scribe - was at his most lucid and perceptive, not least about the process of dying. Their grandson, William Pryor, has put together these letters with prints, drawings and paintings of the time in his book Virginia Woolf and the Raverats.

Jacques died on March 6 1925 in the Villa Adele, their home in Vence, near Nice .